Praxis 5622

Discussion in 'Other Tests' started by SJM9215, Mar 1, 2018.

  1. SJM9215

    SJM9215 Rookie

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    Mar 1, 2018

    I am preparing to take the Praxis 5622: Principles of Learning and Teaching K-6 test on March 15. I have been studying using a Cirrus Test Prep book that I purchased off of Amazon. I used the same brand (? or company?) of prep materials to study for the Praxis 5018 exam. I passed that one so I am confident that the material is good.

    I know that you can't discuss questions on the test but I have been told that the Praxis 5018 test is the hardest one that I will have to take. So, I am wondering if you thought the same?

    After this, I still have to take Praxis 5017 and 5203.

    I am also looking for any other free resources. I am well aware of Teacherstestprep.com but was looking for others!
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 1, 2018

    5622 is a test of teaching practice. If you're well versed in understanding and applying the technical terminology of pedagogy, you should be fine. Try making a habit of identifying and labeling elements of teaching and learning as they crop up in your everyday life (and you'd be surprised how much pedagogy you can squeeze out of, say, giving someone directions).
     
  4. SJM9215

    SJM9215 Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2018

    The passing score depends on your state. I know that in Tennessee, a 160 is required to pass this test.
     
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

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    Mar 13, 2018

    This is a little off topic, but I’ve always wondered: Why are the passing scores different for certain states? I thought the standard 160 was the passing score, but I’ve noticed it’s different across state lines. Are the passing scores slightly relaxed because there are so few teachers applying for those disciplines? I’m genuinely curious about this.
     
  6. SJM9215

    SJM9215 Rookie

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    I am not 100% sure but my opinion is that certain states may just require more or less qualifications due to the level of rigor of the curriculum. If that makes any sense. There's a state ranking list for schools...like schools in Nebraska (where I went for elementary school) were much better than the schools I attended in florida.
     
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  7. SJM9215

    SJM9215 Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2018

    For the record, I passed 5622 with a 183! I was so uneasy after the test because they don't even show a score for the questions portion. I was more nervous about the writing portion anyways.

    I ended up getting 13/16 on the writing though.

    Now I'm preparing for the 5017 test. My study book has content knowledge sections and practice quizzes that are separate from the curriculum, instruction and assessment sections/quizzes. Does anyone know if this test covers a lot of content knowledge? Or mostly pedagogical principles and processes?
     
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  8. 2Dukeboymom

    2Dukeboymom New Member

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    Jul 11, 2018

    How long should I study for the Praxis 5622? A few weeks? A month? I’ve already passed content knowledge and I took the Praxis 5204 (teaching reading) test today. I’d like to schedule Praxis 5622 before school begins in August as it is the last Praxis test I need to take. Does anyone who has taken the Praxis 5622 exam have advice regarding studying tips and the amount of time I should study prior to taking this test?
     
  9. RSA1984

    RSA1984 Rookie

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    Jul 16, 2018 at 9:10 AM

    I recently took the PLT (7-12) and I studied for a total of 4-5 hours I would say. I mostly focused on the Students as Learners and Assessment sections. Everyone is different, so don't hold me to this amount of time needed to study as being concrete. With that being said, I was not a stellar student in my teacher preparation program; there were times I felt like I didn't understand what the heck was going on. I purchased the Kaplan 2017-2018 study guide for the Praxis PLT and just focused on the sections mentioned above. Use YouTube, watch some videos on theories and theorists, get a solid list of assessment types/types of scoring and simply know what they are...what is a diagnostic assessment, a formative assessment, summative assessment, portfolio, aptitude test, achievement test, norm referenced test, criterion, etc...what is mean, median, mode, raw score, scaled score, holistic scoring, analytical scoring. You'll be fine. Simply knowing that an aptitude test helps teachers judge how good students are at acquiring a certain skill or skill will allow you to apply it in terms of a presented educational scenario on the PLT (whether it is a multiple choice question or can be applied in an essay question).

    The biggest thing is to get a good return on your investment. I mentioned in another post that you aren't going to know and remember everything, and that is OK. For example, Kaplan gives you a list of MOST of the essential theories and theorists, so you know the list isn't comprehensive...some people and theories are missing. However, with that being said, and I've said this in other posts, Kaplan is a test-prep company...they specialize in test prep, it's what they are known for, it's how they make their money, it's their bread and butter. They simply take old, retired exams and look for patterns and trends of content that will most likely be covered on the real thing. Let's say they have 100 old exams and they notice Bruner appears on 90 of those exams, but Carol Gilligan only appears on 10 of them, they won't include Gilligan in their study guide because there's a good chance you won't even see her.

    So, my advice would be...

    1) Get the Kaplan 2017-2018 guide and read the section on Students as Learners and watch YouTube videos pertinent to each of those theorists to help you a bit more.

    2) Read the section pertaining to IEPs, 504s, ADA, IDEA...just know what those are at face value. Whom does ADA protect? What does IDEA simply do? What is a 504? You may be presented with a question in which you are given a student and it tells you they have a certain condition; you would be expected to know whether they qualify for an IEP, 504, or neither.

    2) For Assessment, use the CliffNotes guide by Diana E. Kern. It's a solid, 2-3 page entry that tells you various types of assessments and scoring methods. It's straight and to the point.

    3) For Professional Development, Leadership, and Community, learn a couple court cases (e.g. Brown v. Board of Ed...what did this case do? It ended segregation of schools...just know that at face value...just know what some of these court cases achieved, that's all). Know about reflective practice, having partnerships with your colleagues (peer evaluation/observation, working together, etc.), how to develop relationships with parents to help bridge the gap between school and home...it's a lot of common sense. One question from the ETS practice exam bundle I purchased asked something along the lines of "Hailey is an 8th grade student in your math class. Her father recently emailed you asking to update him on her progress this quarter. What should you do?"

    A) Email the father, updating him on Hailey's progress
    B) Delete the email and don't even bother responding
    C) Forward the email to Hailey's social studies teacher
    D) Respond to Hailey's father, telling him you can't tell him anything about Hailey and her progress.

    You should email and update him. If the child is 18 or older, that is where things may get fuzzy (FERPA)

    or

    "John is an 11th grade student; he interested in learning about GPA requirements needed to attend a certain college in Boston, Massachusetts. Who would be the best faculty/staff member to address his question?"
    A. School resource police officer
    B. Guidance counselor
    C. A paraprofessional
    D. School nurse

    4) Get the ETS practice exam bundle ($45). You may or may not have a handful of questions on the real thing, but this is simply to get you used to the exam structure and practicing under time constraints. I took one each week to monitor my progress. I registered for the exam about a month before I took it and just studied a for a few hours on weekends.

    5) Practice writing a few essays in the Kaplan Guide and the ETS bundle. I practiced about 4-6 of them. You aren't being judged on your writing skill, but rather the information contained in your writing. Obviously you can't turn in chicken scratch, but you don't have to focus on writing a 100% grammatically correct product. It's more-so the information you are putting in there. You can use bullets to quickly list and summarize your points. My essays, on average, were basically only 2 medium sized paragraphs...you don't have to write a dissertation. I scored a 13/16 on the essays. It's not about quantity, but rather quality. Don't write about 50 million things and hope that "something will stick." Essay questions generally ask you to list 2 things and talk about why you would do this or use that. Finally, the thing you have to realize with these essays is that there is always more than 1 correct answer. If a question is asking you, hypothetically speaking, "List and explain 2 ways in which your student's parents could support his/her math learning at home." There's a ton of answers you could use...hiring a tutor, the parents personally helping the student,the parents buying resources that the district might not be using, but could still help the student build math skills that will transfer into the classroom...the answers can go on and on. These essays just want to see that you can write/apply something that you would do or suggest and it makes sense; it's something valid that would actually be done in the real world setting.

    I promise the test isn't that bad and is fairly straight forward. I scored a 193 on mine and I am sure you will do just as well. Best of luck.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2018 at 12:37 PM
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  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 16, 2018 at 2:00 PM

    Congratulations, RSA1984! As my gamer friends say, you owned PLT. If you now also own the content that was eluding you during teacher preparation, in the sense of having a surer grasp on it and how it matters to you as a teacher, you've wrung from the process all of the good it has to offer, and I'm thrilled on your behalf.
     
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